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Journalism
Code of Ethics



We BELIEVE in public enlightenment as the forerunner of justice, and in our Constitutional role to seek the truth as part of the public's right to know the truth. We BELIEVE those responsibilities carry obligations that require journalists to perform with intelligence, objectivity, accuracy, and fairness. To these ends, we declare acceptance of the standards of practice here set forth: 
I. RESPONSIBILITY: The public's right to know of events of public importance and interest is the overriding mision of the mass media. The purpose of distributing news and enlightened opinion is to serve the general welfare, journalist who use their professional status as representatives of the public for selfish or other unworthy motives violate a high trust.


II. FREEDOM OF THE PRESS: Freedom of the press is to be guarded as an inalienable right of people in a free society. It carries with it the freedom and the responsibility to discus, question, and challenge actions and utterances of our government and of our public and private institutions, journalist uphold the right to speak unpopular opinions and the privilege to agree with the majority.  
III. ETHICS: Journalists must be free of obligation to any interest other than the public's right to know the truth. 1. Gifts, favors, free travel, special treatment or privilege; can compromise the integrity of journalists and their employers. Nothing of value should be accepted. 2. Secondary employment, political involvment, holding public office, and service in community organizations, should be avoided if it compromises the integrity of journalist and their employers. Journalists their employers should conduct their personal lives in a manner that protects them from conflict of interest, real or apparent. Their responsibilities to the public are paramount. That is the nature of their profession. 3. So-called news comunications from private sourcces should not be published or broadcast without substantiation of their claims to news values. 4. Journalists will seek news that serves the public interest, despite the obstacles. They will make constant efforts to assure that the public's business is conducted in public and that public records are open to public inspection. 5. To be continued.   

If your newspaper does not publish practicing the Code of Ethics, you should question that  you are reading their views of the news.